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Fish and Chips’ Surprising Jewish History. Jamie Oliver confirmed it!

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secular-jew:

Fish and Chips’ Surprising Jewish History. Jamie Oliver confirmed it!

You may be surprised to learn that fish and chips, though wildly popular in England for what seems like eternity, was actually a specialty of the Portuguese Sephardic Jews who fled the Inquisition in the 16th century and found refuge in the British Isles. Celebrity Chef Jamie Oliver referred to this recently in an article in the New York Times, adding that, “Dishes evolve, impacted by trade, war, famine and a hundred other forces.”

Among those “other forces” are dishes born of religious ritual. For observant Jews, fish is pareve, a neutral food in kosher terms, thus an easy way to avoid treyf (non-kosher food) and possibly include dairy in the same meal. It was especially important for Marranos, the so-called crypto-Jews, who pretended to be Christian during the Inquisition. They ate fish on Fridays, when meat was forbidden by the Church, and also saved some to eat cold the next day at lunch, to avoid cooking on Shabbat.

Frying was natural for Jewish home cooks — think of latkes and sufganyiot — and as the Jewish community began to flourish in England, it spurred a taste for its beloved fried, battered fish throughout the country. According to Claudia Roden’s The Book of Jewish Food, Thomas Jefferson tried some on a trip to London and noted that he ate “fish in the Jewish fashion” during his visit. Alexis Soyer, a French cook who became a celebrated chef in Victorian England included a recipe for “Fried Fish, Jewish Fashion” in the first edition of his cookbook A Shilling Cookery for the People (1845). Soyer’s recipe notes that the “Jewish manner” includes using oil rather than meat fat (presumably lard), which made the dish taste better, though also made it more expensive.

There’s some dispute about the where and when of “chips” (what we Americans call French fries and the French call pommes frites). Many historians say that deep-fried, cut-up potatoes were invented in Belgium and, in fact, substituted for the fish during hard times. The first time the word “chips” was used was in Charles Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities in 1859: “husky chips of potato, fried with some reluctant drops of oil.”

The official pairing of fish and chips didn’t happen until a few years later, though. Although there are some who dispute it, most authorities say that it is thanks to a Jewish cook, this time a young Ashkenazi immigrant named Joseph Malin, who opened the first British chippy, AKA fish and chip shop, in London in 1863. The shop was so successful it remained in business until the 1970s.

Who could foresee that fearful Jewish immigrants hiding their true religion and practicing in secret would be responsible for creating one of the most iconic dishes in the U.K.? The down-home dish that Winston Churchill claimed help the British defeat the Nazis, the comfort food that George Orwell said helped keep the masses happy and “averted revolution.” The dish, by the way, that was among the only foods never rationed during wartime because the British government believed that preserving access to it was a way of keeping up morale. A dish that continues to be a mainstay of the British diet.

Think about that the next time you find yourself feasting on this centuries-old — Jewish? British? — recipe.

These days, some restaurants are putting a new spin on fish and chips. Almond crusted. Baked instead of fried. Quinoa coated. Sweet potato fries instead of regular. And those are all fine; as Oliver says, “Dishes evolve.” But plain old fish and chips endures and probably always will. Good recipes usually do.

H/T : @scartale-an-undertale-au

Naveed Anjum

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rocketo
6 hours ago
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seattle, wa
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if you don’t do anything else today,

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uncleromeo:

if you don’t do anything else today,

Please have a moment of silence for the people who were killed instead of freed when news of emancipation finally reached the furthest corners of the american south.

have another moment for the ledgers, catalogs, and records that were burned and the homes that were destroyed to hide the presence of very much alive and still enslaved people on dozens of plantations and homesteads across the south for decades after emancipation.

and have a third moment for those who were hunted and killed while fleeing the south to find safety across the border, overseas, in the north and to the west.

black people. light a candle, write a note to those who have passed telling them what you have achieved in spite of the racist and intolerant conditions of this world, feel the warmth of the flame under your hand, say a prayer of rememberance if you are religious, place the note under the candle, and then blow it out.

if you have children, sit them down and tell them anything you know about the life of oldest black person you’ve ever met. it doesn’t have to be your own family. tell them what you know about what life was like for us in the days, years, decades after emancipation. if you don’t know much, look it up and learn about it together.

This is Juneteenth.

white people CAN interact with this post. share it, spread it.

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rocketo
6 hours ago
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seattle, wa
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woodlandcreatur:theconcealedweapon:I’ve said it before and I’ll say ...

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woodlandcreatur:

theconcealedweapon:

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again:

We’ve solved our needs. We have plenty of housing, a utopian level of food production, clean water and the tech to easily produce more… the only challenge in all of this would be distribution (but its not like we can’t solve that too). Hell we’ve even solved a lot of medicine.

But matching the demand with the supply that we already have isn’t as lucrative as not. So, instead, we live in a system that emulates the hardships of pre-society life- needing to gather food, needing to find shelter, needing to find drinkable water- in order to keep the machine churning. Not to mention this stupid fucking point system we’ve built it around. The entire point of societies, and why animals evolve them in the first place, is to ease the burden on the individual, share resources, and improve the lives of its participants… but doing all that hurts the bottom line.

In other words: Capitalism recreates problems that we’ve already solved in order to keep us desperate, grinding, and hopeless. It destroys the purpose of society for profit.

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rocketo
17 hours ago
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seattle, wa
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Stop Trying to Put Cops Back in Seattle Schools

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I don’t know if having an SRO at Garfield would have prevented school shootings, but I do know that the district uses SROs to discipline and intimidate students. by Amanda Thornewell

In the wake of yet another school shooting, the killing of Amarr Murphy-Paine at Garfield High School, some people are calling for the return of cops in our public schools. Parents are understandably frightened, but cops in schools won’t make our children safe. Rather, they will be used to discipline and intimidate students. My family knows this from bitter experience. 

In 2017, my son, then a 17-year-old at Garfield High School, witnessed a horrifying hazing incident in the swim team locker room. In 2019, he saw possible sexual misconduct and reported the incident to school officials, but nothing was investigated. In January 2020, he reported his observations to a student journalist from the school newspaper, and I got a call from the Garfield school resource officer (SRO)—that is, from a cop assigned to the school. When I picked up the phone, I thought the SRO would be offering help. But he said, “I want you to tell your son to STOP talking to the newspaper.” Those words marked the start of our long battle with Seattle Public Schools and the police they employed. 

As we would soon learn, this call was not from an SRO gone rogue. He was doing exactly what the district wanted. The district did not want the public to know that my son had seen naked seniors squatting over first-year faces while forcing the first-years to do sit-ups. So it turned to the SRO to shut down my son.  

That phone call was just the start of the SRO’s role in the school’s attempt to silence my son. Before I received the phone call, the vice principal brought my son to his office, where the SRO, armed and in full police uniform, stood over my son.  They shut the door and ordered him to stop talking to the press, telling him it would “not be in his best interests'' to keep speaking out.  

My son was terrified and crying by the time his dad arrived. With the SRO blocking the door, the vice principal made my husband and son sign a document that would ensure my son’s silence, a so-called “safety plan.” This safety plan was actually a disciplinary contract designed for juvenile offenders, with punitive consequences and a threat of disciplinary actions and expulsion for disobeying orders, which in this case included a demand to stop talking to the press. 

In a deposition, the SRO later admitted that he wasn’t in the vice principal’s office to investigate anything. During that interview, he said he was there to be “a presence in the room.” In my view, that means he was used as intimidation to enforce my son’s silence. The police uniform and gun gave the impression that my son could be arrested unless he complied.

When we filed a complaint with the district’s Office of Student Civil Rights, the district’s investigator was a former police officer. The investigator attacked my son’s credibility and accused him of “embellishing” due to his “condition.” He declared that the school principal has the right to stop the publication of the school newspaper, even though that is against Washington state law.  

The district was confident it had the law on its side, in the form of the police. The presence of police at school gave the appearance of legitimacy and legality to the district’s actions, whether those actions were legal or not.    

My son’s mental health plummeted after the encounter with the police at Garfield. Some of the numerous staff involved in the successful suppression of the newspaper article were promoted to top tiers, and no one from the district was ever held accountable for using the presence of the SRO to silence my son about the hazing.  

I don’t know if having an SRO at Garfield would have prevented school shootings, but I do know that the district uses SROs to discipline and intimidate students. The SROs are used by the district as weapons of control and intimidation. Police in schools do not make our students safer. 

Amanda Thornewell is the parent of a former Garfield student and current high- schooler in Seattle Public Schools. Her son recently won a settlement with the school district. 

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rocketo
20 hours ago
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seattle, wa
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the idea that restrooms, locker rooms, etc need to be single-sex spaces in order for women to be…

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asneakyfox:

asneakyfox:

the idea that restrooms, locker rooms, etc need to be single-sex spaces in order for women to be safe is patriarchy’s way of signalling to men & boys that society doesn’t expect them to behave themselves around women. it is directly antifeminist. it would be antifeminist even if trans people did not exist. a feminist society would demand that women should be safe in all spaces even when there are men there.

btw this is maybe the single most key distinguishing feature of the terfy strains of radical feminism, the seed all the rest of it springs out of: they have absolutely no faith in the ability of feminism to actually destroy patriarchy. they do not think feminism can truly build a better world. they cannot really even imagine that possibility. they think patriarchy is an inevitable natural consequence of unchangeable biological facts, and therefore the goal of feminism can only be to mitigate the worst effects of patriarchy, not to get rid of it.

they can imagine a society where women get some designated safe spaces without men around. they cannot imagine a society where the presence of men is not inherently a danger to women.

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rocketo
1 day ago
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seattle, wa
sarcozona
5 days ago
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Epiphyte City
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“My first end-of-life patient was a 97-year-old man. He had a...

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“My first end-of-life patient was a 97-year-old man. He had a much younger girlfriend; she was seventy-four. But they loved each other so much. Back when their spouses were still alive, the four of them had been great friends. They would double date together. And when their spouses passed away, the two of them became a thing. Every day she would come over for lunch. I’d always cook a little meal for them. I’d prepare the table; I’d lay out my little candles and my little flowers. As soon as she arrived I’d put on music and dim the lights, then I’d leave the room and go wait in the bedroom. They would cuddle and snuggle. And the beauty of it was, even though he couldn’t control his fluids at that point, she never minded the smell. Her love for him was so great that they would still kiss and all that good stuff. When the doctors said that it was time for him to go to hospice, he said he didn’t want to go. He told them that he wanted to come back home and die with me. I was with him in the end. My patients never die alone. Never, ever. One week after his passing I was hired by his girlfriend’s family. She had terminal Alzheimer’s, and I ended up staying with her for seven years. I fell in love with her. We were family, just family. She used to be a tap dancer. We’d sing together. And if she didn’t feel like singing, I’d sing. Even near the end, she always knew when something was wrong with me. When I wasn’t being the Gabby that she knew, she would always know. When the doctors said it was time for her to go to hospice, her children said: ‘We want her to die with Gabby.’ In the final days she wouldn’t eat, she’d lock her jaw. But she would always eat for me. One night I could see the fright in her eyes, and I knew it was time. My patients never die alone. Never, ever. So I climbed under the covers with her. And she passed away in my arms.”

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sarcozona
17 hours ago
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May we all be given such care, especially this woman who’s given it to so many
Epiphyte City
rocketo
1 day ago
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seattle, wa
angelchrys
2 days ago
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Overland Park, KS
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